Part 5 Properties of Whole Numbers

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Some preparatory definitions. On the off chance that we have entire numbers a, b, and c such that a

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Part 5 Properties of Whole Numbers

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Some preparatory definitions If we have entire numbers a , b , and c to such an extent that a × b = c then we say that a partitions c or a will be a component of c or a will be a divisor of c and c is a various of an or c is separable by a (We can simply trade a with b .)

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Properties of Divisibility Suppose that a, m, n, k are entire numbers where a ≠ 0 . In the event that a partitions m and a partitions n , then a partitions ( m + n ) . On the off chance that a partitions m however a does not isolate n , then a does not separate ( m + n ) . On the off chance that a partitions both m and n , and m ≥ n , then a partitions ( m – n ) . In the event that a partitions m yet a does not isolate n , and m ≥ n , then a does not separate ( m – n ) . On the off chance that a partitions m , then a partitions km . Transitive Property of Divisibility If a, b, c are non zero entire numbers with the end goal that a partitions b and b isolates c , then a partitions c .

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Important comments: 0 is distinct by any non-zero number, No number is detachable by 0.

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Different sorts of entire numbers Prime numbers A number is prime on the off chance that it is > 1 and it is just distinguishable by 1 and itself. e.g. 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, … Composite numbers A number is composite on the off chance that it can be composed as the result of two littler entire numbers. e.g. 4 (=2×2), 6 (=2×3), 10 (=2×5), … Identities The numbers 0 and 1 are not prime nor composite, they are only personalities for particular operations.

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Prime numbers assume a vital part inside the entire numbers since they are the essential segments. All the more unequivocally, we have the accompanying Theorem Every entire number greater than 1 is either a prime number or a result of prime numbers. (as it were, the prime numbers can create every single entire number greater than 1 by augmentation.)

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Factorization Trees According to the past hypothesis, if a number n is not prime, we should have the capacity to separate it to a result of prime numbers. Here is the way, 60 This tree is in no way, shape or form one of a kind, we can without much of a stretch make another, for example, 60 6 10 2 30 2 3 2 5 6 2 3 However, the gathering of prime numbers we get from the "leaves" of the tree is dependably the same. At the end of the day, 60 = 2×2×3×5 regardless of how we factorize it.

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Unique Factorization Theorem Any entire number greater than 1 can be factorized into a result of prime numbers in precisely one way on the off chance that we list its prime elements from little to vast. 2×2×3×3×3×5×7 Example: 3780 =

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n 179 Test for Primeness (i.e. a quicker approach to figure out if an entire number is prime or not) Theorem An entire number n ( >1) is prime on the off chance that it is not separable by any prime number  Example: Is 179 a prime number? a. figure which is approx. 13.379 b. every single prime number  13.3 are 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13 c. Is 179 distinguishable by 2? No Is 179 separable by 3? No Is 179 detachable by 5? No Is 179 distinguishable by 7? No Is 179 distinct by 11? No Is 179 detachable by 13? No Therefore 179 is prime. (Take note of: this diminish the work from checking 177 numbers to only 6 numbers!)

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Divisibility Tests Test of distinctness for 2 : An entire number n is detachable by 2 if and just if its last digit is separable by 2 (i.e. indeed) Test of distinctness for 5 : An entire number n is distinguishable by 5 if and just if its last digit is separable by 5 (i.e. 0 or 5)

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Divisibility Tests Test of detachability for 4 : An entire number n is separable by 4 if and just if the number spoke to by its last two digits is distinct by 4. Cases: 21732 is distinguishable by 4 on the grounds that 32 is detachable by 4. Take note of that neither the digit 3 nor 2 is distinct by 4. It is the number 3×10+2 that is distinguishable by 4. Consequently it isn't right to state that the last two digits are distinguishable by 4. 44442 is not separable by 4 on the grounds that 42 is most certainly not.

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Divisibility Tests Test of detachability for 8 : An entire number n is distinct by 8 if and just if The number spoke to by its last three digits is distinguishable by 8. Illustrations: 201432 is separable by 8 in light of the fact that 432 is detachable by 8, 716510 is not distinguishable by 8 on the grounds that 510 is not distinct by 8

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Divisibility Tests Test of distinctness for 3 : An entire number n is separable by 3 if and just if the whole of its digits is detachable by 3. Illustration: 71653092 is detachable by 3 since 7 + 1 + 6 + 5 + 3 + 0 + 9 + 2 = 33 Test of distinctness for 9 : An entire number n is separable by 9 if and just if the entirety of its digits is distinguishable by 9.

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Divisibility Tests Test of detachability for 11 : An entire number n is distinguishable by 11 if and just if the substitute total of its digits is distinct by 11. Illustrations: Let's first take a gander at all 2-digit products of 11, 11, 22, 33, 44, 55, 66, 77, 88, 99 The distinction of the two digits is 0, henceforth distinguishable by 11.

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Divisibility Tests Test of distinguishableness for 11 : An entire number n is distinct by 11 if and just if the substitute aggregate of its digits is separable by 11. Cases: 3-digit products of 11 121, 132, 154, 165, … , 957, 968, 979, 990. You ought to see that 1 st digit – 2 nd digit + 3 rd digit is detachable by 11.

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Divisibility Tests Test of distinguishableness for 11 : An entire number n is separable by 11 if and just if the substitute whole of its digits is detachable by 11. More illustrations: 72952 is detachable by 11 since 7 – 2 + 9 – 5 + 2 = 11, which is separable by 11. 56823 is not distinct by 11 since 5 – 6 + 8 – 2 + 3 = 8, which is not separable by 11.

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Greatest Common Factor (GCF) Definition: The GCF of two entire numbers an and b is the biggest entire number c that can partition into both an and b . Strategies for discovering GCF( a , b ) Set crossing point technique – relies on upon posting all elements of an and b .

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Greatest Common Factor (GCF) Definition: The GCF of two entire numbers an and b is the biggest entire number c that can isolate into both an and b . Techniques for discovering GCF( a , b ) Set convergence strategy – relies on upon posting all components of an and b . case: to discover the GCF(12, 18)

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Greatest Common Factor (GCF) Definition: The GCF of two entire numbers an and b is the biggest entire number c that can isolate into both an and b . Techniques for discovering GCF( a , b ) Set convergence strategy – relies on upon posting all components of an and b . case: to discover the GCF(12, 18) components of 12: 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12.

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Greatest Common Factor (GCF) Definition: The GCF of two entire numbers an and b is the biggest entire number c that can isolate into both an and b . Strategies for discovering GCF( a , b ) Set crossing point strategy – relies on upon posting all elements of an and b . case: to discover the GCF(12, 18) components of 12: 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12. components of 18: 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 18.

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Greatest Common Factor (GCF) Definition: The GCF of two entire numbers an and b is the biggest entire number c that can separate into both an and b . Strategies for discovering GCF( a , b ) Set crossing point strategy – relies on upon posting all elements of an and b . case: to discover the GCF(12, 18) components of 12: 1 , 2 , 3 , 4, 6 , 12. variables of 18: 1 , 2 , 3 , 6 , 9, 18. Obviously the red numbers are the regular variables and 6 is the biggest,  GCF(12, 18) = 6

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Greatest Common Factor (GCF) Methods for discovering GCF( a , b ) (strategy I is straight forward and simple to learn yet moderate for bigger numbers) Factorization technique – relies on upon the total factorization of an and b . case: to discover the GCF(24, 180) 24 = 2×2×2×3, 180 = 2×2×3×3×5 and by the "Covetous calculation", we pick all the prime elements regular to both numbers (counting multiplicities)  GCF(24, 180) = 2×2×3

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(technique II is still hard to utilize if the numbers are too extensive and hard to factorize.) Euclidean Algorithm – relies on upon lessening expansive numbers to littler ones. Hypothesis: if a > b , then GCF( a , b ) = GCF( a - b , b ) as such, we can lessen the bigger number by subtracting it with the littler one, without changing the GCF. (snap to look up)

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(technique II is still hard to utilize if the numbers are too substantial and hard to factorize.) Euclidean Algorithm – relies on upon lessening expansive numbers to littler ones. Hypothesis: if a > b , then GCF( a , b ) = GCF( a - b , b ) as it were, we can lessen the bigger number by subtracting it with the littler one, without changing the GCF.

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Euclidean Algorithm – relies on upon lessening huge numbers to littler ones. Hypothesis: if a > b , then GCF( a , b ) = GCF( a - b , b ) at the end of the day, we can diminish the bigger number by subtracting it with the littler one, without changing the GCF. Case: GCF(481, 296) = GCF(481 – 296, 296) = GCF(185, 296) = GCF(185, 296 – 185) = GCF(185, 111) = GCF(74, 111) = GCF(74, 37) = GCF(37, 37) = 37

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Lowest Common Multiple (LCM) Definition: The LCM of two entire numbers an and b is the littlest entire number c that is distinguishable by both an and b . Strategies for discovering LCM( a , b ) Set crossing point strategy – relies on upon posting little products of an and b . case: to discover the LCM(15, 24) products of 15: products of 24:

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Lowest Common Multiple (LCM) Definition: The LCM of two entire numbers an and b is the littlest entire number c that is separable by both an and b . Techniques for discovering LCM( a , b ) Set convergence strategy – relies on upon posting little products of an and b . case: to discover the LCM(15, 24) products

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