How a Bill Becomes a Law

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Who can propose a law? Anybody can propose a thought for a law. Notwithstanding, just a Member of Congress can take a proposed law to the House of Representatives or the Senate.

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What happens first? An individual from the House or Senate drafts a bill. They present the bill to the House or Senate. The bill is doled out a number that starts with: H.R. for House of Representatives S. for Senate The bill is then sent to the suitable board of trustees.

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The Standing Committee This is a perpetual board of trustees in the House or Senate that studies charges identified with a general subject, for example, instruction, horticulture or science. The panel seat allots the bill to the proper subcommittee.

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The Subcommittee The subcommittee concentrates on bills identified with a sub-set of the themes secured by the standing board of trustees. The majority of the individuals from the subcommittee are a piece of the standing board of trustees. The vast majority of the examination in Congress happens here. The seat of the subcommittee, in meeting with other advisory group individuals, chooses whether to plan a bill for discourse. The subcommittee may likewise choose to stop activity on a bill that they believe is a bit much or insightful. The bill then passes on.

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The Subcommittee - proceeded with The subcommittee first holds hearings on the bill, allowing supporters, rivals and specialists to voice their perspectives. Corrections (changes) to the bill are then recommended and voted on. The subcommittee may likewise choose to compose an altogether new bill. At long last, the subcommittee votes on whether to take the bill to the full board of trustees for a vote. In the event that the bill does not pass, it bites the dust.

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The Standing Committee The board of trustees talks about the bill. Advisory group individuals recommend and vote on revisions. The board of trustees votes on whether to send the bill to the full House or Senate.

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The Standing Committee – cont. In the event that the bill passes, the board of trustees composes a report clarifying: The key purposes of the bill The progressions they have made How this bill looks at to current laws Why they suggest this bill for endorsement The bill and the report are then sent to the full House or Senate.

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The Floor (entire House or Senate) The bill is set on the timetable of the House or Senate until it is planned for talk. The House and Senate have distinctive tenets for debating the bill.

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Debate on the House floor The House is led by the Speaker of the House Before level headed discussion starts, a period breaking point is set for to what extent any Member can talk (as a rule 1 – 5 minutes). Initial a Member talks who is for the bill and after that one who is against the bill. Banter about proceeds along these lines.

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Debate on the House floor – cont. Banter on a bill can be finished by a basic larger part vote. Taking after this open deliberation, revisions to the bill can then be proposed and wrangled about. Similar guidelines apply. At long last, the bill is put to a vote.

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Debate on the Senate floor The Senate is led by the Vice President; the President Pro Tempore may seat in his place. There are no time points of confinement to discuss in the Senate. Individuals may represent the length of they pick. Alterations might be offered whenever amid level headed discussion. Toward the end of civil argument, the bill is put to a vote.

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What happens next? Both the House and the Senate must pass comparative types of a bill. On the off chance that a bill is passed in just the House or the Senate, it is sent to the next one for level headed discussion, change and a vote. After both the House and the Senate have passed comparable bills, the two bills are sent to a gathering panel.

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The Conference Committee The gathering council incorporates individuals from both the House and the Senate. The advisory group talks about the contrasts between the two bills. They re-compose the bill in a shape that they think will go in both the House and the Senate and vote on it. After they pass the re-composed bill, the advisory group composes a report that contains: The re-composed bill A clarification of how they worked out the contrasts between the two bills

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Back to the floor The meeting board of trustees report with the re-composed bill is sent to the House for a vote. In the event that the House passes the charge, it is sent to the Senate. On the off chance that the House or the Senate does not pass the charge, it bites the dust. On the off chance that the bill goes in both the House and the Senate, it is sent to the President.

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The President The President has 4 alternatives: Sign into law. He can sign the bill, which then turns into a law. Law without mark. He can give the bill a chance to sit around his work area for 10 days without marking it while Congress is in session. The bill then turns into a law.

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The President - proceeded with Veto. He can decide to not sign the bill, so it won't turn into a law. Be that as it may, if the bill is then passed by 2/3 of both the House and the Senate, despite everything it turns into a law. Stash veto. On the off chance that, following 10 days, he has not marked it and Congress is no more extended in session, the bill does not turn into a law.

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I'm only a bill, Yes, I'm just a bill, And I'm staying here on Capitol Hill. All things considered, it's a long, long excursion To the capital city, It's a long, long hold up While I'm sitting in board of trustees But I know I'll be a law some time or another . . .

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At slightest I trust and ask that I will, But today I'm still only a bill. {Interlude} I'm only a bill, Yes I'm just a bill, And I got similarly as Capitol Hill. All things considered, now I'm stuck in board And I stay here and hold up

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While a couple key Congressmen Discuss and banter about Whether they ought to Let me be a law… Oh how I trust and supplicate that they will, But today I am still only a bill. {Interlude}

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I'm only a bill, Yes I'm just a bill, And on the off chance that they vote in favor of me on Capitol Hill, Well then I'm headed toward the White House Where I'll hold up in a line With a considerable measure of different bills For the President to sign.

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And on the off chance that he signs me then I'll be a law . . . Gracious, how I trust and implore that he will, But today I am still only a bill. {Interlude} No! Yet, how I trust and I implore that I will, But today I am still only a bill! {Interlude}

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Acknowledgment for Song School House Rocks site. http://media.atlantic-records.com/media/schoolhouse_rock_rocks/schoolhouse_rock_rocks/bill.wav

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