Twentieth-Century Economic Theory

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Section Objectives. The comparison of exchangeThe amount hypothesis of moneyClassical economicsKeynesian economicsThe monetarist schoolSupply-side economicsThe objective desires hypothesis. 15-2. Copyright ?2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights held.. The Equation of Exchange. A great part of the Keynesian-Monetarist civil argument rotates around the amount hypothesis of cash which itself is based o

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Section 15 Twentieth-Century Economic Theory 15-1 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights held.

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Chapter Objectives The condition of trade The amount hypothesis of cash Classical financial aspects Keynesian financial aspects The monetarist school Supply-side financial aspects The sound desires hypothesis 15-2 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights held.

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The Equation of Exchange Much of the Keynesian-Monetarist wrangle about rotates around the amount hypothesis of cash which itself depends on the condition of trade The condition of trade and the amount hypothesis of cash are anything but difficult to befuddle Perhaps in light of the fact that the condition of trade is utilized to clarify the amount hypothesis of cash 15-3 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights held.

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The Equation of Exchange The condition of trade is MV = PQ M is the aggregate dollars in the country's cash supply V is the quantity of times each year every dollar is spent P is the normal cost of the considerable number of products and enterprises sold amid the year Q is the amount of merchandise and ventures sold amid the year 15-4 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights held.

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The Equation of Exchange M times V (MV) would be add up to spending. Add up to spending by a country amid a given year is GDP. Hence, MV = GDP P times Q (PQ) is the aggregate sum of cash got by dealers of every single last great and administrations created by a country amid a given year. This additionally is GDP. Along these lines, PQ = GDP Things equivalent to a similar thing are equivalent to each other, thusly, MV = PQ 15-5 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights held.

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The Equation of Exchange The accompanying illustration will be in billions of dollars without the dollar signs MV = PQ 900 X 9 = PQ 8,100 = PQ 8,100 = 81 X Q 8,100 = 81 X 100 8,100 = 8, 100 The condition of trade should dependably adjust, as must all conditions. 15-6 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights saved.

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The Quantity Theory of Money The Crude rendition of the Quantity Theory of Money This form holds that when the cash supply ( M ) changes by a specific rate, the value level ( P ) changes by that same rate MV = PQ 900 X 9 = 81 X 100 1800 X 9 = 162 X 100 16,200 = 16,200 15-7 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights held.

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The Quantity Theory of Money The Crude variant of the Quantity Theory of Money This rendition holds that when the cash supply ( M ) changes by a specific rate, the value level ( P ) changes by that same rate M V = P Q 900 X 9 = 81 X 100 1800 X 9 = 162 X 100 16,200 = 16,200 If V and Q stay consistent, the rough form of the amount hypothesis of cash is right 15-8 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights held.

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A Closer Look at Q and V Since 1950 V has risen reasonably consistently from around three to almost seven During retreats, creation, and in this way Q will fall Q fell at a yearly rate of around 4% amid the 1981-82 subsidence During recuperations, generation gets, so we go from a declining Q to a rising Q Obviously, neither V or Q are steady Therefore, the rough form of the amount hypothesis of cash is invalid 15-9 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights saved.

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The Quantity Theory of Money The complex variant of the "Amount Theory of Money" expect any fleeting changes in V are either little or unsurprising But what occurs next is completely up to the level of creation, Q 15-10 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights saved.

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The Sophisticated Quantity Theory of Money If we are well beneath full business, an expansion in M will lead for the most part to an expansion in Q If we are near or at full work, an increment in M will lead for the most part to an increment in P 15-11 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights held.

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Classical Economics The traditional school of financial aspects was standard from around 1775 to 1930 The established school has the accompanying precepts Recessions cure themselves Say's law works Savings will be contributed Interest rate system Quantity hypothesis of cash Assume V and Q are consistent Government can't cure subsidences 15-12 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights saved.

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Keynesian Economics The Keynesian school of financial aspects was standard from the mid 1930s to around 1970 15-13 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights saved.

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Keynesian Economics The Keynesian school has the accompanying fundamentals The issue with subsidences is deficient request The main seek is after the administration to spend enough cash to raise total request adequately to get individuals back to work The legislature could print the cash or obtain it If enough (recently made cash) was spent, the retreat would end No one would put resources into new plant and hardware when a lot of their ability was sit without moving Wages and costs were not downwardly adaptable on account of institutional hindrances If M rises, individuals may not spend the extra cash, but rather simply hold it So much for the amount hypothesis of cash 15-14 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights saved.

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The Monetarist School Stresses the Importance of the Rate of Monetary Growth Milton Friedman, a business analyst who did thorough investigations of the relationship between the rate of development of the cash supply inferred that The United States has never had a genuine expansion that was not joined by fast financial development When the cash supply has developed gradually, the nation has had no swelling 15-15 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights saved.

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The Monetarist School Stresses the Importance of the Rate of Monetary Growth Building on the amount hypothesis of cash, the monetarists concur with the classicals that when the cash supply develops, the cost level ascents, yet not at the very same rate Recessions are created when the Federal Reserve expands the cash supply at not as much as the rate required by business – say, anything under 3 percent a year By and substantial the actualities have borne out the monetarists' examination 15-16 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights saved.

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The Monetarist School The Basic Propositions of Monetarism The way to stable financial development is a steady rate of increment in the cash supply Expansionary money related arrangement will just incidentally discourage loan fees Expansionary money related approach will just briefly decrease the unemployment rate Expansionary monetary strategy will just briefly raise yield and work 15-17 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights held.

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The Monetarist School The Monetary Rule Increase the cash supply at a consistent rate When there is a subsidence, this unfaltering implantation of financial development will get the economy When there is expansion, a relentless rate of fiscal development will back it off • When the nation has an enduring eating regimen of cash, the financial wellbeing will be generally great – if not generally incredible - no exceptionally fat years and no extremely incline years 15-18 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights held.

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The Monetarist School The Decline of Monetarism's prominence begun to decrease in the late 1970s and mid 1980s The Fed's strategy on fiscal development, out of this world loan costs, joined with two retreats appeared to make individuals search somewhere else for their financial masters 15-19 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights held.

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Supply-Side Economics Supply-side financial aspects came into vogue in the mid 1980s Supply-siders mantra was to cut expense rates, government spending, and government control The question of supply-siders is to raise total supply Many of the undesirable impacts of high minimal duty rates are the work impact, the reserve funds and venture impact, and the disposal of profitable market trades 15-20 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights held.

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The Work Effect Facing high negligible duty rates, many individuals decline to work more than a specific number of hours additional time or go up against second occupations and different types of additional work Instead, they pick more relaxation time Output is less when individuals work less When individuals work less, their salary is less 15-21 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights saved.

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The Saving and Investment Effect High peripheral expense rates on premium pay will give a disincentive to spare, or if nothing else to make funds accessible for venture purposes People who acquire cash for speculation purposes trust that this will prompt to more noteworthy benefits But, in the event that these benefits are liable to a high minor assessment rate, at the end of the day this is a disincentive to contribute The economy will stagnate 15-22 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights saved.

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The Elimination of Productive Market Exchanges A gainful market trade is the point at which you work at what your are great at and employ somebody who is working at what they are great at to help out you There is a genuine misallocation of labor(perhaps a huge number of dollars) when the beneficial market trade is wiped out due to high minimal duty rates It will pay you to work less at what you are great at to carry out another occupation that you are not all that great at (you don't contract somebody is preferred at it over you to do it) 15-23 Copyright 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights saved.

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The Laffer Curve The method of reasoning of t

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