The African-American Commercial center

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Chapter by chapter list. IntroductionSlide 3Demographic

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Slide 1

The African-American Marketplace

Slide 2

Table of Contents Introduction Slide 3 Demographic & Geographic Trends Slides 4-17 Purchasing Power & Spending Patterns Slides 18-24 Media & Technology Usage Slides 25-28 Advertising to African-Americans Slides 29 - 32 Marketing and Advertising Slides 33-38

Slide 3

According to the U.S. Registration Bureau, the African-American populace achieved 39.6 million in 2009 (12.9% of the U.S. populace), making them the second biggest minority assemble. Source: U.S. Registration Bureau Annual Population Estimates 7/09, discharged 6/10

Slide 4

A Demographic Profile

Slide 5

Key Census Bureau Facts The African-American populace is 52% female to 48% male. The African-American populace is more youthful with a middle age of 31.3 years contrasted with non-Hispanic whites at 41.2 years. African-American family units are marginally bigger than the normal non-dark families – 2.6 people versus 2.5 people. The African-American family unit is marginally more inclined to have youngsters under 18 (0.8 people versus 0.6 people for whites and others). 83% of African-Americans 25 years and more established finished secondary school or a larger amount of instruction in 2009. 33.8% of African-Americans were selected in school in 2009. Source: U.S. Enumeration Bureau, Annual Estimates 7/09; Bureau of Labor Statistics 10/09

Slide 6

African-American Population is Younger than Non-Hispanic White Population Source: U.S. Registration Bureau Annual Population Estimates 7/09

Slide 7

Completed 4 Years of College or More: U.S. Add up to & African-American for Population 25+ 73% More African-American Adults are College Grads in 2008 versus 1990 Source: U.S Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, 7/09

Slide 8

Educational Attainment Percent of "25 and Over" in African-American Population in 2008 Source: U.S Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, 7/09

Slide 9

Types of Housing 46% of African-American buyers claim their own homes. There are 32% of African-American property holders with home loans. 14% of African-American property holders are without home loans. 54% of African-American customers are tenants. Source: Average yearly consumptions and attributes, Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2008 (most recent information accessible)

Slide 10

Household Income Percent Distribution of Income for Households in 2007 Source: U.S Census Bureau, Current Population Survey 2008 (most recent information accessible)

Slide 11

Geographic Patterns

Slide 12

The Nation's New Mix Source: L.A. Times, Based on Census 2000

Slide 13

Five States with the Largest African-American Population New York 3.35 million Florida 2.98 million Texas 2.98 million Georgia 2.97 million California 2.45 million Source: U.S. Statistics Bureau Annual Population Estimates 7/09

Slide 14

Washington, D.C. Has the Largest Percentage of African-Americans in Its Total Population Washington, DC 54.0% Mississippi 37.2% Louisiana 32.1% Georgia 30.2% Maryland 29.7% Source: U.S. Evaluation Bureau Annual Population Estimates 7/09

Slide 15

Majority of African-Americans Lived in the South In 2008 Source: US Census Bureau Annual Population Estimates 7/09

Slide 16

Top 25 African-American TV Markets % Total African-American TV HH Cume % African-American TV HH DMA Market African-American TV HH Rank 1 New York 1,256,380 8.9 8.9 2 Atlanta 664,860 4.7 13.6 3 Chicago 589,240 4.2 17.8 4 Washington, DC 571,980 4.1 21.9 5 Philadelphia 551,070 3.9 25.8 6 Los Angeles 475,180 3.4 29.1 7 Detroit 378,730 2.7 31.8 8 Houston 377,960 2.7 34.5 9 Dallas - Ft. Worth 368,640 2.6 37.1 10 Raleigh-Durham 302,670 2.2 39.3 11 Baltimore 297,580 2.1 41.4 12 Miami 297,110 2.1 43.5 Source: Nielsen Media Research DMA and Demographic Rank, January 2011

Slide 17

Top 25 African-American TV Markets % Total African-American TV HH Cume % African-American TV HH DMA Market African-American TV HH Rank 13 Memphis 268,620 1.9 45.5 14 Charlotte 220,560 1.6 47.0 15 Norfolk 219,690 1.6 48.6 16 Cleveland 210,780 1.5 50.1 17 St. Louis 193,670 1.4 51.5 18 Birmingham 180,510 1.3 52.8 19 San Francisco 180,350 1.3 54.0 20 New Orleans 175,000 1.2 55.3 21 Orlando 173,730 1.2 56.5 22 Tampa-St. Pete. 169,960 1.2 57.7 23 Richmond 159,090 1.1 58.9 24 Jackson, MS 148,610 1.1 59.9 25 Columbia, SC 144,170 1.0 60.9 Source: Nielsen Media Research DMA and Demographic Rank, January 2009

Slide 18

Purchasing Power & Spending Patterns

Slide 19

Buying Power of African-Americans According to gauges from the University of Georgia's Selig Center for Economic Growth: The country's dark purchasing influence will ascend from $318 billion in 1990, to $910 billion in 2009, to $1.1 trillion in 2014, up by 257% in 24 years. This general rate pick up overwhelms the 189% expansion in white purchasing power and the 206% expansion in all out purchasing power (all races consolidated). Source: University of Georgia Selig Center for Economic Growth, Third Quarter 2009

Slide 20

Share of Total Buying Power In 2014, African-Americans' share of U.S. purchasing force will be 8.7%, up from 8.5% in 2009 and up from 7.4% in 1990. Broadly, African-American customers will represent right around nine pennies out of each dollar that is spent. Source: University of Georgia Selig Center for Economic Growth, Third Quarter 2009

Slide 21

Factors Leading to Gains in African-American Buying Power Population development is quicker than the aggregate populace and the African-American populace is more youthful. From 1990 to 2009, the dark populace developed by 28.8% contrasted with 16.8% for the white populace and 23% for the aggregate populace. Another variable is African-Americans' rising levels of training. Evaluation information demonstrate that the rate more than 25 who have finished secondary school or school ascended from 66.2% in 1990 to 83% in 2008. Picks up likewise mirror an expanding number of African-Americans who are beginning and extending their own organizations. Bigger extents of African-Americans are either entering the workforce interestingly or are climbing from passage level employments. Source: University of Georgia Selig Center for Economic Growth, Third Quarter 2009

Slide 22

Top 10 States for African-American Buying Power State Totals in Billions 1 New York $ 86 2 Texas $ 72 3 California $ 62 4 Georgia $ 61 5 Florida $ 61 6 Maryland $ 52 7 Illinois $ 45 8 North Carolina $ 41 9 Virginia $ 38 10 New Jersey $ 35 Source: University of Georgia Selig Center for Economic Growth, Third Quarter 2009

Slide 23

States With Largest Growth in African-American Buying Power State % Increase 2000-2009 1 Montana 311 2 Idaho 261 3 Wyoming 252 4 North Dakota 186 5 South Dakota 183 6 Maine 179 7 Hawaii 156 8 Utah 154 9 Vermont 150 10 New Mexico 143 Source: University of Georgia Selig Center for Economic Growth, Third Quarter 2009

Slide 24

Top African-American Average Annual Consumer Expenditures Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Consumer Expenditure Survey 2008 (Latest data accessible)

Slide 25

Media Usage/Technology Usage

Slide 26

African-Americans View Almost 40% More TV Than the U.S. Normal Weekly Tuning per TV Household (Hours: Minutes) Source: Nielsen Media Research, Television Audience 2009

Slide 27

Cable Plus ADS Hasn't Increased Since 2007 in African-American TV Households Cable Plus ADS % infiltration in TV HH Source: Nielsen Media Research, Television Audience 2009

Slide 28

African-American Internet Usage eMarketer reported information from an Internet Innovation Alliance examine that demonstrated 40% of African-Americans utilize the Internet consistently, with 19% utilizing it constantly. Another 27% were viewed as intermittent clients. 21% of African-Americans never utilize the Internet and 11% said they utilize it once in a while. African-American respondents were about twice as likely as Hispanics to never go on the web. The top Internet exercises for African-Americans were: staying in contact with loved ones, instruction related exercises, getting to data like climate information, and business related exercises like employment seeking. Source: eMarketer 12/30/09

Slide 29

Advertising Campaigns Targeted to African-Americans

Slide 30

General Mills Increasing Spending in African-American Marketing Programs In an extension of the Feeding Dreams program, the new crusade concentrates on grassroots endeavors, media relations, and an expansion in advanced effort. Nourishing Dreams commenced its second year on August 3 rd by respecting nearby legends in 4 markets: Memphis, Norfolk, VA, Birmingham, and Charlotte, NC. The extended online nearness incorporates: a Web webpage, Facebook page, Twitter account, and YouTube Channel. As indicated by Kimberley Bow Sundy, Manager of PR and Multicultural Marketing, "In intense financial times, you need to take a gander at purchaser portions who are extremely mark steadfast and make sense of how you can truly improve your exchange with them." Source: targetmarketnews.com 7/30/09

Slide 31

Ford Is the Exclusive Automotive Partner of the 2009 Essence Music Festival Ford supported the Essence celebration in New Orleans over the July 4 th end of the week, with Beyonce as the featured craftsman. The Essence celebration is the country's biggest yearly assembling of African-American music and culture, and is extraordinary in light of the fact that it incorporates 3 days of free strengthening courses. One of a kind projects were made for New Orleans, similar to sponsorship of the Women's Day Seminar, to vehicle ride and drive openings with the 2010 Ford Fusion Hybrid. Different exercises incorporate a Ford-supported Steve Harvey Morning Show Live Broadcast and books marking, a Ford Fusion Hybrid Giveaway as a major aspect of their Women Driving Progress Program, a unique Lincoln-supported T.D. Jakes Tribute, and sneak reviews of its most up to date items. Source: targetmarketnews.com 6/11/09

Slide 32

Mandela Day 2009: "Two Hands" Celebrated interestingly on July 18 th in New York City. Publicized through video, print, outdoo

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