Showing Taking off Climate

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Neighborhood sounding. Flight Service Station (1-800-WXBrief) National Weather Service ... Air terminal robotized climate administrations. Getting end-of-flight climate information ...

Presentation Transcript

Slide 1

Showing Soaring Weather Soaring Safety Foundation FIRC Rich Carlson

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Basic Principles Obtain the fundamental climate information Know how the environment functions Use some straightforward estimations to check whether taking off is conceivable Graphs and pictures enhance understudy understanding Weather examination proceeds all through the flight

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Obtaining Weather Data Look Outside Local sounding Flight Service Station (1-800-WXBrief) National Weather Service Duat outsider administration supplier Internet (email and Web)

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Atmospheric Assumptions Pressure slip by rate 1" hg/1000 ft Dry adiabatic pass rate 5.4 o (3c)/1000 ft Wet adiabatic pass rate less than dry Dew point decreases 1 o/1000 ft

Slide 5

Soaring Calculations Thermal Index (TI) measured - adiabatic (minus is better) Cloud base (max surface - dewpoint)/4 (in 1000's of ft)

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Obtaining a Weather Briefing FSS call 1-800-992-7433 (WXBrief) Identify yourself as a lightweight flyer pilot Give Aircraft "N" number Say sort of flight and area Ask for standard preparation Ask for surface reports Ask for winds overtop figure Ask for Soaring conjecture Ask for other applicable information (Notams, TFR's)

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Pseudo-Adiabatic plot Src: Soaring Flight Manual

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Typical FSS Soaring Forecast T.I. at 5000 ft -5 T.I. at 10,000 ft +2 Height of - 3 7200 Top of Lift 8500 Max Expected Temp 89 Morning Low* 50

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Step 1, draw the adiabatic line

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Step 2, include the T.I. dabs

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Step 3 Draw the sounding

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Internet Sources Kevin Ford - http://www.soarforecast.com NOAA-FSL, Forecast Systems Laboratory - http://www-frd.fsl.noaa.gov/mab/soundings/java/Aviation Digital Data Service - http://adds.aviationweather.noaa.gov Dr Jack BLIPMAP - http://www.drjack.info/BLIP/index.html

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Kevin Ford Plots === Interpolations (temps in deg. F, heights in feet MSL) === MSL *TI* Wdir@kts trig VirT 1.2 degrees/division ("`": Dry Adiabatic) - - . - - - 10000 12.4 40 | - 9.8 ` : 9500 11.6 39 | - 8.6 ` : 9000 10.7 280 27 37 | - 7.5 ` : 8500 9.8 35 | - 6.5 ` : 8000 8.8 290 25 34 | - 5.5 ` : 7500 7.9 32 | - 4.5 ` : 7000 6.9 295 24 30 | - 3.5 ` : 6500 6.0 29 | - 2.6 ` : 6000 3.7 300 27 25 | - 4.0 ` : 5500 3.6 24 | - 1.5 ` : 5000 3.5 24 | 0.9 ` : 4500 3.3 24 | 3.3 ` : 4000 2.1 22 | 3.7 ` : 3500 0.8 19 | 4.1 `: 3000 - 0.5 18 | 4.4 :` 2500 - 1.8 16 | 4.8 : ` 2000 - 2.1 15 | 7.0 : ` 1500 - 2.1 15 | 9.7 : ` 1000 - 2.1 15 | 12.3 : `

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NOAA Forecast Plot

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ADDS METAR/TAF Data

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Dr Jack BLIPMAP

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Local variables Terrain highlights Ridges Mountains Rivers Lakes Towns

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Local elements Ridge conditions Calculations Predictions 90 O +/ - 30 O to edge line 10 - 15 kts Ridges Lift augments 2 – 3 times the edge stature Ridge length ought to be a few miles

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Ridge Lift Zones

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Local components Wave conditions Calculations Predictions Wind at pinnacle 15 – 20 kts Wind 2000 m above pinnacle Same course 20 – 25 kts higher

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Mountain Wave System

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Transition pilot wave outline

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Some rotor look into in advance

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Some rotor examine in advance

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Thermal Predictors/Indicators Negative Thermal Index values at alt. Estimate plots Clouds Birds/Gliders revolving around Dirt, crops, houses, creatures ascending before your eyes

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Go/No-Go Decision Making Use practical situations Storms gauge for later in the day/evening Effect of solid x-wind Local versus X-C flight Pilot encounter level

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Continuing Weather Analysis Obtaining enroute climate information Flight Watch (122.0 Mhz) Airport robotized climate administrations Obtaining end-of-flight climate information Wind course to land Current Altimeter setting

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En Route Flight Advisory Service (Flight Watch) AIM area 7-1-5 Real-time climate advisories National scope above 5000 ft on 122.0 Available 6:00 am to 10:00 pm State ARTCC office, N number, & closest VOR name

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Types of Fronts Cold Good taking off conditions squall lines 50 - 300 miles ahead Warm temperature reversal wide cloud framework goes before front Occluded both warm & chilly cloud designs

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Cold Front Src: Aviation Weather AC 00-6A

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Warm Front Src: Aviation Weather AC 00-6A

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Cold-Occlusion Front Src: Aviation Weather AC 00-6A

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Warm-Occlusion Front Src: Aviation Weather AC 00-6A

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Seasonal Weather Operations Density Altitude Thunderstorms Frost, Snow Ice Temperature extremes Wind shear Microbursts

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Determining When to Land What impact does the twist have on landing?

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27 9 Effect of 20 Kt twist Time on Downwind: More, Less, no Change? Height misfortune: More, Less, no Change? 20 Kts

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27 9 Effect of 20 Kt twist Time on base: More, Less, no Change? Height misfortune: More, Less, no Change? 20 Kts

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27 9 Effect of 20 Kt twist Time on Final: More, Less, no Change? Elevation misfortune: More, Less, no Change? 20 Kts

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27 9 Effect of 20 Kt wind Which way is your understudy prone to fly? Which way do you need them to fly? 4 20 Kts 3 1 2

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Final Approach (No wind) 60 kts @ 500 ft/m good rate 12:1 skim incline 24 seconds 200 2400

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Final Approach (20 Kt Head Wind) 60 kts @ 500 ft/m average rate 8:1 coast slant 24 seconds 200 2400 1600

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Final Approach (20 kt wind shear) 60 kts @ 500 ft/m fair rate Maintain consistent speed amid approach How much time remains? 200 20 kts 0 kts X Y 2400 1600

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Decision Time With a 20 kt shear, would you say you are probably going to overshoot (into range Y) undershoot (into territory X) Said another way, what activities do you have to take to achieve your expected touchdown guide close the spoilers toward broaden (undershooting) open the spoilers to sink quicker (overshooting) Another variety, what will the point spot do? climb on the shelter (undershooting) move down on the covering (overshooting)

Slide 48

Glide Distance

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How much Altitude does it take to recapture unique velocity? ?

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Transition through Wind Shear Line

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Final Approach (20 Kt Wind Shear) 2 seconds for the lightweight plane to balance out at the new sink rate AOA increments from 0.5 o to 5.0 o 200 20 kts 0 kts 2400 1600 934

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Distance & Altitude amid recuperation stage

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Final Approach (20 Kt Wind Shear) 3 seconds to quicken back to 60 Kts Glider nose is 20 o underneath the skyline 200 20 kts 0 kts 1230 2400 1600

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Final Approach (Likely result in 3 cases?) No Wind Constant headwind 20 Kt Wind Shear 200 2400 1230 1600

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Shear Encounters When can this happen? Arriving in windy conditions Landing region protected by hindrances During great warm conditions

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Recommendations Plan for this loss of vitality Pick an approach speed that will consider some misfortune Move base leg nearer to runway edge Be higher turning Final Be set up to close the spoilers Be set up to pitch forward to keep up/recuperate velocity

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Conclusions Shear line causes loss of Total Energy Large Pitch change required to quickly recoup lost vitality Large measure of Time "lost" while add up to vitality changes Immediate activity is required to achieve unique touchdown point!

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Effects on Landing Steady wind requires more energy 800 feet closer or 100 ft higher for 20 kt wind Changing wind requires more vitality Sink requires more vitality Ask yourself "Are you more inclined to end up getting low or high on last?"

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