Section 9 BUDGETING

0
0
2547 days ago, 850 views
PowerPoint PPT Presentation
Planning BASICS Benefits of Budgeting . Requires all levels of administration to arrange ahead and formalize objectives on a repeating basisProvides unmistakable goals for assessing execution at every level of responsibilityCreates an early cautioning framework for potential issues. Planning BASICS Benefits of Budgeting.

Presentation Transcript

Slide 1

Section 9 BUDGETING A financial plan is a formal composed articulation of administration's arrangements for a predefined future day and age, communicated in monetary terms Control Device & Planning Tool

Slide 2

BUDGETING BASICS Benefits of Budgeting Requires all levels of administration to prepare and formalize objectives on a repeating premise Provides distinct targets for assessing execution at each level of duty Creates an early cautioning framework for potential issues

Slide 3

BUDGETING BASICS Benefits of Budgeting Facilitates coordination of exercises inside the business Results in more prominent administration consciousness of the substance's general operations and the effect of outer elements Motivates staff all through association to meet arranged destinations

Slide 4

BUDGETING BASICS Length of Budget Period May be set up for any timeframe Most basic - one year Supplement with month to month and quarterly spending plans Different spending plans may cover diverse eras Continuous twelve-month spending Drops the month simply finished and includes a future month This keeps administration arranging an entire year ahead

Slide 5

BUDGETING BASICS Budgeting Process Base spending objectives on past execution Collect information from hierarchical units Begins a while before the finish of the ebb and flow year Start with the Sales Budget

Slide 6

BUDGETING BASICS Budgeting Process Factors considered in Sales Forecasting: General financial conditions Industry patterns Market inquire about reviews Anticipated publicizing and advancement Previous piece of the pie Price changes Technological improvements

Slide 7

BUDGETING BASICS Budgeting Process The planning procedure is normally casual in little organizations Assigned to a spending board in bigger organizations

Slide 8

BUDGETING BASICS Budgeting and Human Behavior Participative Budgeting "base to-top" approach is called Participative Budgeting Advantages: Leads to more exact spending gauges since lower level directors have more point by point learning of their zone Employees see the procedure as reasonable because of contribution of lower level administration Overall objective - deliver a financial plan considered reasonable and achievable by chiefs while as yet meeting corporate objectives

Slide 9

BUDGETING BASICS Budgeting and Human Behavior Participative Budgeting Disadvantages: Can be tedious and exorbitant Can encourage budgetary "gaming" through budgetary slack This is a circumstance where administrators deliberately belittle planned incomes or overestimate planned costs so that spending objectives are less demanding to meet

Slide 10

BUDGETING BASICS - The Master Budget An arrangement of interrelated spending plans that constitutes an arrangement of activity for a predetermined era Contains two classes of spending plans: Operating spending plans: Individual spending plans that outcome in the readiness of the planned salary proclamation Financial spending plans: The capital consumptions spending plan, the money spending plan, and the planned accounting report – concentrate principally on money needs to store operations and capital uses

Slide 11

BUDGETING BASICS - The Master Budget - Components

Slide 12

OPERATING BUDGETS: Sales Budget The business spending plan is the primary spending plan set it up is gotten from the business figure The business conjecture is administration's best gauge of offers income for the spending time frame Every other spending plan relies on upon the business spending plan

Slide 13

Hayes Company Sales Budget For the Year Ending December 31, 2005 Quarter Expected unit deals Unit offering cost Total deals 1 3,000 x $60 $180,000 2 3,500 x $60 $210,000 3 4,000 x $60 $240,000 4 4,500 x $60 $270,000 Year 15,000 x $60 $900,000 OPERATING BUDGETS: Sales Budget Example – Hayes Company Expected deals volume: 3,000 units in the main quarter with 500-unit increase increments at each after quarter Sales cost: $60 per unit

Slide 14

OPERATING BUDGETS: Production Budget The generation spending demonstrates the units that must be delivered to meet foreseen deals It is gotten from deals spending plan in addition to the coveted completed merchandise Required generation in units equation:

Slide 15

OPERATING BUDGETS: Production Budget Example – Hayes Company Hayes Co. trusts it can meet future deals needs with a completion stock of 20% of next quarter's deals

Slide 16

OPERATING BUDGETS: Direct Materials Budget The immediate materials spending demonstrates both the amount and cost of direct materials to be bought It is gotten from the immediate materials units required for creation (from the generation spending plan) and craved consummation materials stock Budgeted cost of direct materials to be acquired = required units of direct materials X foreseen cost per unit

Slide 17

OPERATING BUDGETS: Direct Materials Budget Example – Hayes Company Desires a closure stock of 10% of the following quarter's creation prerequisites The assembling of every unit requires 2 pounds of crude materials at a normal cost of $4 per pound

Slide 18

OPERATING BUDGETS: Direct Materials Budget Example – Hayes Company

Slide 19

OPERATING BUDGETS: Direct Labor Budget The immediate work spending indicates both the amount of hours and cost of direct work important to meet generation necessities The aggregate direct work cost equation is:

Slide 20

OPERATING BUDGETS: Direct Labor Budget Example – Hayes Company Direct work hours from the generation spending Two hours of direct work required for every unit Hourly wage rate $10

Slide 21

OPERATING BUDGETS: Manufacturing Overhead Budget The assembling overhead spending demonstrates the normal assembling overhead expenses for the spending time frame It recognizes settled and variable overhead costs Example – Hayes Company Fixed cost sums are accepted Expected variable expenses per coordinate work hour: Indirect materials: $1.00 Indirect work: $1.40 Utilities: $0.40 Maintenance: $0.20

Slide 22

Manufacturing overhead rate per coordinate work hour ($246,400  30,800 ) $8.00 Hayes Company Manufacturing Budget For the Year Ending December 31, 2005 Quarter 1 $ 6,200 8,680 2,480 1,240 18,600 20,000 3,800 9,000 5,700 38,500 $57,100 2 $ 7,200 10,080 2,880 1,440 21,600 20,000 3,800 9,000 5,700 38,500 $60,100 3 $ 8,200 11,480 3,280 1,640 24,600 20,000 3,800 9,000 5,700 38,500 $63,100 4 $ 9,200 12,880 3,680 1,840 27,600 20,000 3,800 9,000 5,700 38,500 $66,100 Year $ 30,800 43,120 12,320 6,160 92,400 80,000 15,200 36,000 22,800 154,000 $246,400 Variable Costs Indirect materials ($1.00 per DLH) Indirect work ($1.40 per DLH) Utilities ($ .40 for every DLH) Maintenance ($.20 per DLH) Total variable Fixed costs Supervisory pay rates Depreciation Property assessment and protection Maintenance Total settled Total assembling overhead Direct Labor hours 6,200 7,200 8,200 9,200 30,800

Slide 23

OPERATING BUDGETS: Selling & Administrative Expense Budget Is a projection of expected working costs Distinguishes amongst settled and variable costs Example – Hayes Company Fixed cost sums are accepted Expected variable expenses per unit sold (from deals spending plan): Sales commissions: $3.00 Freight-out: $1.00

Slide 24

Year $ 45,000 15,000 60,000 20,000 60,000 30,000 4,000 6,000 120,000 $180,000 1 $ 9,000 3,000 12,000 5,000 15,000 7,500 1,000 1,500 30,000 $42,000 2 $ 10,500 3,500 14,000 5,000 15,000 7,500 1,000 1,500 30,000 $44,000 3 $ 12,000 4,000 16,000 5,000 15,000 7,500 1,000 1,500 30,000 $46,000 4 $ 13,500 4,500 18,000 5,000 15,000 7,500 1,000 1,500 30,000 $48,000 Hayes Company Selling & Administrative Budget For the Year Ending December 31, 2005 Quarter Variable Costs Sales commissions ($3 per unit) Freight-out ($1 per unit) Total variable Fixed costs Advertising Sales pay rates Office Salaries Depreciation Property duties and protection Total Fixed Expenses Total Selling/Admin. Costs

Slide 25

OPERATING BUDGETS: Budgeted Income Statement The planned wage explanation is set up from the working spending plans Sales Budget Production Budget Direct Materials Budget Direct Labor Budget Manufacturing Overhead Budget Selling and Administrative Expense Budget

Slide 26

FLEXIBLE BUDGETS Projects spending information for different levels of action Essentially, a progression of static spending plans at various movement levels The budgetary procedure is more helpful on the off chance that it is versatile to changes in working conditions Flexible spending plans can be set up for each sort of spending plan in the ace spending plan Flexible spending plans are static spending plans at various action levels

Slide 27

DEVELOPING THE FLEXIBLE BUDGET Steps Identify the action level and the applicable scope of action Identify the variable expenses and decide the planned variable cost per unit of action for each cost Identify the settled expenses and decide the planned sum for each cost Prepare the financial plan for chose additions of the action level inside the significant range

Slide 28

FLEXIBLE BUDGET – A CASE STUDY Example – Fox Manufacturing Co. Month to month correlations of genuine and planned assembling overhead expenses for Finishing Department 2007 ace spending plan Expected yearly working limit of 120,000 direct work hours Overhead expenses:

Slide 29

FLEXIBLE BUDGET – A CASE STUDY Example – Fox Manufacturing Co. Recognize the movement level and the significant range action level: coordinate work hours important range: 8,000 – 12,000 direct work hours for each month Identify the variable expenses, and decide the planned variable cost per unit of action for each cost

Slide 30

FLEXIBLE BUDGET – A CASE STUDY Example – Fox Manufacturing Co. Distinguish the settled expenses and decide the planned

SPONSORS