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Part 11 Power and Political Behavior © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights saved.

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The Concept of Power Power – the capacity to impact someone else Influence – the way toward influencing the musings, conduct, and sentiments of someone else Authority – the privilege to impact someone else © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights saved.

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Interpersonal Forms of Power Reward Power – specialist's capacity to control the prizes that the objective needs Coercive Power – operator's capacity to bring about a disagreeable affair for an objective Legitimate Power – operator and target concur that specialist has compelling rights, in view of position and shared understanding Referent Power – in light of interpersonal fascination Expert Power – operator has information target needs © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights held.

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Power: Compliance or Effectiveness Compliance: Focused on doing things right (administration) Reward, Coercive, Legitimate power Least successful yet frequently utilized my supervisors Effectiveness: concentrated on making the best choice (initiative) Referent, master control Develop through interpersonal associations with representatives © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights saved.

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Expert Power! Which Power Is Most Effective? Most grounded relationship to execution & fulfillment Transfers key aptitudes, capacities, and information inside the association Employees disguise what they watch & gain from directors they consider "specialists" © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights saved.

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Guidelines for Ethical Use of Power © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights held.

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Guidelines for Ethical Use of Power © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights held.

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[ Criteria for Using Power Ethically ] Does the conduct create a decent result for individuals both inside and outside the association? Does the conduct regard the privileges of all gatherings? Does the conduct treat all gatherings impartially and decently? © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights held.

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How to detect a butt hole (Sutton, 2007) After conversing with the asserted butt hole, does the 'objective" feel persecuted, mortified, de-eneergized, or put down by the individual? Specifically, does the objective feel more regrettable about him or herself? Does the charged butt hole point his or her venom at individuals who are less effective as opposed to at those individuals who are all the more capable? (Kiss up, kick down) © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights saved.

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[ Two Faces of Power ] Personal Power utilized for individual increase Social Power used to make inspiration used to finish assemble objectives © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights held.

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Social power Create inspiration or achieve assemble objectives Best supervisors have a high requirement for social power combined with a moderately low requirement for alliance They need to do useful for the greater part of their workers, not only the ones that are their pals Watch a flick if time grants © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights saved.

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Kanter's Symbols of Power Intercede for somebody in a bad position Obtain situations for favored workers Exceed spending restrictions Procure above-normal raises for representatives Place things on meeting motivation Access to early data Have best supervisors search out their sentiment Common Theme: Doing things for others © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights held.

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Kanter's Symbols of Powerlessness Top Executives spending chops rebuffing practices beat down correspondences Staff Professionals imperviousness to change turf insurance Managers dole out outside attribution - accuse others or environment First-line Supervisors excessively close supervision rigid adherence to rules do work as opposed to prepare Key to conquering weakness: share power and delegate basic leadership © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights saved.

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Korda's Power Symbols Furnishings Time Access © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights saved.

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Organizational Politics the utilization of force and impact in associations © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights held.

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Political Behavior activities not formally authorized by an association that are taken to impact others keeping in mind the end goal to meet one's close to home objectives © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights saved.

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Conditions Encouraging Political Activity Unclear objectives Autocratic basic leadership Ambiguous lines of power Scarce assets Uncertainty © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights held.

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Influence Tactics © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights held.

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Influence Tactics © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights held.

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Influence Tactics The most much of the time utilized impact strategies are: Consultation Rational influence Inspirational advances Ingratiation © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights held.

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[ Using Influence Tactics ] Develop and keep up open lines of correspondence every which way Treat the objectives of impact endeavors with fundamental regard Understand that impact connections are complementary Direct impact endeavors towards hierarchical objectives © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights saved.

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Political Skill capacity to complete things through constructive interpersonal connections outside the formal association © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights held.

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[ Managing Political Behavior ] Recognize it Open correspondence Clarify execution desires Participative administration Encourage collaboration among work bunches Manage rare assets well Provide a steady hierarchical atmosphere © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights saved.

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+ Psychological Strain Morale Job Satisfaction Affective Commitment Turnover Intentions Performance Task OCB + - Perception Of Politics - + Chang, C., Rosen, C., Levy, P. 2009. AMJ, 52(4): 779-801 © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights saved.

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Managing Up: The Boss © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights held.

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Managing Up: The Boss SOURCE: Reprinted by consent of Harvard Business Review. From "Dealing with Your Boss," by J. J. Gabarro and J. P. Kotter, (May–June 1993): p. 155. Copyright © 1993 by the Harvard Business School Publishing Corporation; all rights held. © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights saved.

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Empowerment making conditions for increased inspiration through the advancement of a solid feeling of individual self-viability © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights held.

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Four Dimensions of Empowerment Meaning Competence Self-assurance Impact © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights saved.

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[ Guidelines for Empowering ] Express trust in workers and set superior desires Create open doors for participative basic leadership Remove bureaucratic imperatives that smother self-rule Set helpful and important objectives © 2011 Cengage Learning. All rights held.

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