Roman Mythology A Presentation by James Martin

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Roman Mythology A Presentation by James Martin

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OVtline of Presentation Section A. Basics I – Introduction II –Di Indigentes III – The Greek Influences Section B. Advance Detail IV – Daily life And Religion V – Art and Architecture* VI – Discussion of writings VII – Conclusion *Online Component Only

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Part I. IntrodVction What is Mythology? Roman versus Greek? What has been lost? Why? Essential Concepts: Native Gods versus Received Gods What is vital to the Romans? What is the impact on the day by day life of a normal Roman?

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What is Mythology? The study, investigation, and translation of the gathered myths of a general public and how they relate back to the center estimations of the way of life.

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What are Myths? Recounts a conventional story including extraordinary creatures or strengths (not generally) exemplifies and gives a clarification to something, for example, the early history of a general public a religious conviction or custom a characteristic marvel (a cultural\moral purposeful anecdote)

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Why StVdy Myths? Give another point of view on the way of life Highlights the qualities and requests of a general public Allows us to all the more precisely look into changed civic establishments and their conviction frameworks

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What are oVr SoVrces? Verse and Epic Poetry Art – Pottery\Frescos\Sculpture, and so forth. Plays Legal Documents Historical Accounts from Roman Historians Letters, Personal Documents

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Basic Time Table Four Significant Dates\Periods 8 th Century BCE - Estruscan and Di Indigentes 1 st Century BCE – Domination of Greek thought 325 CE – Constantine and the Council of Nicea 391 CE - Theodosius I announces Christianity as the main worthy religion.

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Part II. di indigetes

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di indigetes Translates from Latin to "speaker inside" Complex gathering of divine beings, goddesses, and spirits Opposes the di novensides the "newcomer divine beings" Primarily female – not very many male indigenous divine beings Indigenous male divine beings had places of force Abstractions of a specific quality or common shape Georg Wissowa's wording.

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Who did they Serve? Early Romans: Agrarian Society Also Bellicose; partial to battling and war Gods fit the day by day needs of regular daily existence Jupiter, leader of alternate gods and spirits, was in charge of the rain Early Roman clique was less polytheistic but rather more polyspiritualistic

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What were the Roman divine beings like? little independence individual histories needed relational unions and ancestries Unlike the lords of the Greeks, they were not considered to work in the way of mortals.

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Who were the most critical Roman divine beings? At the leader of the most punctual pantheon in Rome was: Jupiter – Chief god, divine force of rain, lightning and administered over laws and social request Mars – lord of vegetation and war What does this educate us concerning early Roman culture?

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What happened to the early roman divine beings? Numerous survived! Acclimatized into creating Roman Mythos Adopted different identities Connections made (where fitting) to similar Greek divine beings

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Imperial Roman Coins Honored the past might of Rome and her religion Connected the present organization with the past – underlined its energy

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VirtVs helmeted right bosom uncovered standing left Victory image in right hand left hand laying on shield skewer against left arm Represents: Courage, Virtue

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HONOS Holding Cornacopia and olive branch Represents: gallantry, respect, military equity

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PVdicitia Veiled Right hand on bosom Scepter in left hand Represents: Virtue, Chastity

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JanVs Double head Could see past and future Doorways and entryways Reversed Spear in one hand Thunderbolt in other "Janitor" Represents: Time/Ages

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Part Iv. The Greek INflVence

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Why did it happen? More settled and wealthier legacy of stories of the divine beings More progressed design treatment of sanctuaries and places of worship More accentuation on the human frame and life systems on their figures

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What changed the most? The divine beings were exemplified and sorted out into a geneology Temples and hallowed places, similar to the pantheon were presently more structurally complex The force of religion moved far from the individual family and into the minister (flamen)

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Part IV. Every day Life and Religion Primary Concerns Pontifex Maximus Pax Deorum Daily Examples The Cults The Business World Vestal Virgins The Lararium at home

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Pontifex MaxiMVs The devout cleric of the Ancient Roman College of Pontiffs ( bridgebuilders ) . The pontifex maximus, the Vestal Virgins, the Rex Sacrorum, and the flamines. Augustus and later heads turned into the religious pioneers

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Pax Deorvm The Temple of Hercules Victor, in the Forum Boarium.

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The Cvlts Mystery cliques offered their followers a certain vision of the way of the world association of religions was very particular. The Cult of the Emperor The Cult of Isis The Cult of Christianity

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Divine Bvsiness quickly hindered or put off minister or a justice that he had seen a glimmer of lighting or some other type of perfect dissatisfaction

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Sacerdos VEstalis virgin sacred female clerics of Vesta, the goddess of the hearth. The objects of the Virgins were basically the hearth fire and unadulterated water drawn into a dirt vase. Picked somewhere around 6 and 10 years old.

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The Lararivm hallowed place of the home where offerings and supplications are made to the Gods. A private station to appeal to the " Lar " Lar is Roman family divinity who ensured the land that the family lived upon

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The Lararivm "Salve lar familiaris (adoratio) . Salvete Di Penates (adoratio) . Balm Gen Patris Familias. Balm Vesta Mater." "It is so!"

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Part V. Workmanship, ArchitectVre and Religion Online Component Check the Wiki page for a few cases of religion in craftsmanship and engineering

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Part VI. DiscVssion Livy: The Rape of Lucretia Sextus Tarquinius came back to the place of Conlatinus, with one of his sidekicks. He was generally welcomed and given the friendliness of the house, and goaded with affection, he held up until he was certain other people was snoozing. "When I have murdered you, I will put by you the body of a bare worker, and everybody will say that you were slaughtered amid a shocking demonstration of infidelity." "how can anothing go well for a lady who has lost her respect? There are the signs of another man in your bed, Conlatinus. My body is significantly filthy, however my heart is still immaculate, as my demise will demonstrate. "By this blood, which was so unadulterated before the wrongdoing of the sovereign, I swear before you, O divine beings, to pursue the King Lucius Tarquinius Superbus, with his criminal spouse and all their posterity, by flame, iron, and every one of the techniques I have available to me, and never to endure Kings in Rome evermore, whether of that group of any other."

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Part VI. DiscVssion Livy: The Rape of Lucretia, Page Two "how would anything be able to go well for a lady who has lost her respect? There are the signs of another man in your bed, Conlatinus. My body is significantly dirty, however my heart is still immaculate, as my passing will demonstrate. "By this blood, which was so immaculate before the wrongdoing of the ruler, I swear before you, O divine beings, to pursue the King Lucius Tarquinius Superbus, with his criminal spouse and all their posterity, by flame, iron, and every one of the techniques I have available to me, and never to endure Kings in Rome evermore, whether of that group of any other."

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Part VI. DiscVssion Ovid: The Creation Myth There was resistance in all things: hot clashed with cool, wet with dry, substantial with light, and hard with delicate. The earth he sorted out into five zones, a similar number that exist in paradise, which is isolated into two areas on the right, two on the left, and one in the inside. On earth the center zone is excessively hot for residence and the two external zones are excessively icy, however between these extremes the god made two calm zones where warmth and chilly are adjusted.

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Part VI. DiscVssion Ovid: The Creation Myth Jove was going to hit the earth with a flood of thunderbolts when he understood that the fire brought about by such an assault may debilitate paradise itself, so he set out to pulverize the world's tenants by water rather than by blazing lightning. To this end he chained the North Wind, then charged the South Wind to deliver unlimited downpours. Jove's sibling Neptune, divine force of the oceans, brought about the tides and the waves to ascend upon the land and the streams to flood their banks. Creation comes to fruition through the determination of restricting strengths.

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Part VII. ConclVsion Native Gods versus Received Gods What is imperative to the Romans? What is the impact on the day by day life of a normal Roman?

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