Race Records and Hillbilly Music

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Race Records and Hillbilly Music

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Musical Diversification Record organizations focused on new gatherings of people between World War I and World War II (1918–40). Recorded music got from the society customs of the American South Migration of a huge number of individuals from provincial groups to urban communities, for example, New York, Chicago, Detroit, Atlanta, and Nashville in the years taking after World War I

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Race Records and Hillbilly Music Terms utilized by the American music industry to arrange and promote southern music. Race Records Recordings of exhibitions by African American artists created predominantly available to be purchased to African American audience members Hillbilly or Old-Time Music performed by and proposed available to be purchased to southern whites

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Mamie Smith (1883–1946) Known as the "Ruler of the Blues" Pioneer blues vocalist, piano player, and dark vaudeville entertainer In 1920, she recorded the hits "Insane Blues" and "It's Right Here For You, If You Don't Get It, 'Tain't No Fault of Mine." Mamie Smith's prosperity as a recording craftsman opened up the record business to recordings by and for African Americans.

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Race Music The term was initially connected by Ralph Peer (1892–1960). A Missouri-conceived headhunter for Okeh Records Had filled in as an aide on Mamie Smith's first recording sessions

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Race Records The exhibitions discharged on race records incorporated an assortment of musical styles: Blues Jazz Gospel choirs Vocal quartets String groups Jug-and-washboard groups Verbal exhibitions Sermons Stories Comic schedules

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The Blues Definitions: 1. Portrays an inclination—"I'm feeling down" 2. Alludes to the blues style of singing or playing blues vocals—like strengthened discourse limit run; unpleasant, very curved timbre 3. Demonstrates a musical frame—twelve-bar melody, AAB content

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Blues Form A standard cadenced symphonious structure in which a twelve-bar harmony movement is fixing to the AAB message in three four-bar phrases. It is likewise called "twelve-bar blues."

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Text of a Blues Song Rhymed couplet—every ensemble of a blues melody contains two lines of content with the main line rehashed. The content is AAB: I would rather not see the eve-nin' sun go down I prefer not to see the eve-nin' sun go down It makes me believe I'm on my last go-round

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Form of a Blues Song Melodic frame—every line is sung to its own melodic thought. Musical shape—every expression of a standard blues melody endures four bars. One melody of a blues tune is twelve measures in length (3x4). Consonant frame—the amicability of a blues tune is I, IV, and V harmonies.

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Twelve-Bar Blues 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 I IV I V IV I

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Classic Blues Classic blues tunes were performed by high-class dance club artists. Alberta Hunter (1895–1984) Billed as the "Marian Anderson of the Blues" Ethel Waters (1896–1977) Entertained the developing African American white collar class in New York, Chicago, and other northern urban communities

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Classic Blues Singers who performed in a to some degree rougher style Gertrude "Mama" Rainey (1886–1939) Popularly known as the "Mother of the Blues" Bessie Smith (1894–1937) "Sovereign of the Blues" Rainey and Smith built up their singing styles in the unpleasant and-tumble dark vaudeville and tent shows.

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Bessie Smith (1894–1937) The "Ruler of the Blues" The most imperative and powerful of the lady blues vocalists from the mid twentieth century. Conceived in Chattanooga, Tennessee; started recording in 1923 Stylistically a blues artist notwithstanding when performing curiosity and vaudeville numbers; had a glorious voice The centerpiece of Columbia's race record names

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W. C. Convenient (1873–1958) The "Father of the Blues" The most powerful of the great blues authors Son of a preservationist minister who restricted him from playing the guitar Learned to play the cornet rather Went on to school, got a degree, and turned into a teacher Handy helped to establish the principal African American–owned distributed house. His music owed much to Tin Pan Alley and also African American society customs. His greatest hit was "St. Louis Blues," written in 1914.

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Listening: "St. Louis Blues," by W. C. Helpful, sung by Bessie Smith (1925) This was the kind of recording that acquainted quite a bit of white America with the blues. A cross breed way to deal with the blues Removed from the "down-home" elucidation by nation blues entertainers and authors, for example, Charley Patton and Blind Lemon Jefferson.

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Listening: "St. Louis Blues," by W. C. Helpful, sung by Bessie Smith (1925) Accompaniment — reed organ and cornet Louis Armstrong on cornet Fred Longshaw on reed organ Call and reaction amongst cornet and Smith Form Based on the AABA display ordinarily found in Tin Pan Alley tunes The last segment is truly a "C," having another song yet identifying with the prior "An" area of harmonies. The "An" and "C" areas speak to the twelve-bar blues.

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Listening: "St. Louis Blues," by W. C. Helpful, sung by Bessie Smith (1925) An a. I prefer not to see the eve-nin' sun go down a. I would rather not see the eve-nin' sun go down b. It makes me believe I'm on my last go-cycle An a. Feelin' tomorrow as I do today a. Feelin' tomorrow as I do today

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Listening: "St. Louis Blues," by W. C. Helpful, sung by Bessie Smith (1925) B a. St. Louis lady… b. Pulls my man around… a. Wasn't for powder… b. The man I cherish… C I got them St. Louis blues…

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