Prologue to Teaching: Becoming a Professional Third ...

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Prologue to Teaching: Becoming a Professional Third Edition by Donald Kauchak and Paul Eggen Professor: J. E. Murphy, Ph.D. 3208 Alexander Hall (270) 809-3024 janis.murphy@coe.murraystate.edu http://coekate.murraystate.edu/educators/murphy/EDU103.htm Kauchak and Eggen, Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, third Ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights saved.

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Understand this present reality of educating through the content " s bona fide contextual analyses Explore being an expert instructor and to apply polished methodology to your own vocation. Find out about today " s different understudies, consider the instructive ramifications of assorted qualities, and apply differences issues to your own educating rationality. See how change influences schools today and tomorrow. This content was intended to help you: Kauchak and Eggen, Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, third Ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights held.

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Become an expert educator by watching issue-related video and genuine instructors in real life on the content's DVD, and also working through the case-based end-of-part highlight, Preparing for Your Licensure Exam . Find out about today's various classrooms through the Teaching in Urban Settings dialogs and the Exploring Diversity include . Outline a particular change issue in each section as it identifies with section content and react by making an individual assessment in the content's component, Teaching in an Era of Reform . The components in this content will help you… Kauchak and Eggen, Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, third Ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights held.

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Become an expert instructor by… Reading the new Chapter 11 on Creating Productive Learning Environments Considering suggestions for classroom circumstances in the Decision Making highlights Taking the Preparing for Your Licensure Exams toward the end of each part Expanding your comprehension and association with section content by viewing: In Today's Classrooms — practical looks of educators working in genuine classrooms Video Perspectives—present and questionable instructive issues on ABC News Kauchak and Eggen, Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, third Ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights saved.

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Learn about today's assorted classrooms through: Teaching in a Urban Setting talks Exploring Diversity highlights Kauchak and Eggen, Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, third Ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights saved.

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Frame a particular change issue: In each section as it identifies with part substance and make an individual assessment of its potential in the content's element, Teaching in an Era of Reform . Kauchak and Eggen, Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, third Ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights held.

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Online Practice/Self-Assessment Resources www.prenhall.com/kauchak Companion Website gives : Chapter-by-Chapter Self Assessment Exercises Web Links Feedback for Preparing for Your Licensure Exam Developing as a Professional Online Activities Going Into Schools Virtual Field Experience Online Portfolio Activities Kauchak and Eggen, Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, third Ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights held.

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Chapter 1 Do I Want to Be a Teacher?

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Intrinsic Rewards in Teaching Come from inside and are specifically fulfilling for enthusiastic or scholarly reasons Emotional prizes focus on working with youngsters and knowing you're adding to the world. Scholarly prizes are identified with contemplating and showing scholastic substance. Kauchak and Eggen, Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, third Ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights held.

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Extrinsic Rewards in Teaching Rewards that originate from outside Include employer stability, excursions, advantageous calendars, and word related status Can both pull in individuals to educating and initiate them to leave Kauchak and Eggen, Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, third Ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights held.

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Complexities of Classrooms are multidimensional. Classroom occasions are concurrent. Classroom occasions are prompt. Classrooms are eccentric. Classrooms are open. Kauchak and Eggen, Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, third Ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights saved.

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Multiple Roles of Teachers Creating beneficial learning situations Working with guardians and different parental figures Collaborating with associates Kauchak and Eggen, Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, third Ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights held.

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Characteristics of Professionalism A specific assortment of information Autonomy Emphasis on basic leadership and reflection Ethical models for direct Kauchak and Eggen, Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, third Ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights saved.

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A Specialized Body of Knowledge of substance: instructors can't educate what they don't know Pedagogical substance information: the capacity to show and clarify conceptual ideas General educational learning: having the capacity to oversee and train successfully Knowledge of learners and learning: understanding the formative and adapting needs of understudies Kauchak and Eggen, Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, third Ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights held.

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Diversity: The Changing Face of U.S. Classrooms Diversity in U.S. classrooms Culture Ethnicity Socioeconomic status (SES) Gender contrasts Teacher reactions to assorted qualities impact understudy learning and educator vocation fulfillment. Kauchak and Eggen, Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, third Ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights held.

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Teaching in Rural, Suburban, and Urban Environments Rural school locale Tend to be littler with littler schools Are less socially various Often look for starting educators Suburban school areas Are middle of the road as far as both size and social assorted qualities Are wealthier on account of higher duty base Job openings are more aggressive Kauchak and Eggen, Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, third Ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights saved.

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Teaching in Rural, Suburban, and Urban Environments (proceeded with) Urban school areas Are the biggest and most socially assorted Considerable openings for work Kauchak and Eggen, Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, third Ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights saved.

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Reform: Changes in Teacher Preparation Raising models for entrance into instructor preparing programs Requiring educators to take more thorough courses than in the past Requiring higher principles for licensure, including educator competency tests Expanding educator planning programs from 4 years to 5 Requiring experienced educators to take more thorough expert advancement courses Kauchak and Eggen, Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, third Ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights held.

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Reform: Teacher Accountability Measures Competency Testing Targets fundamental abilities, topic, and expert learning Through PRAXIS or state-particular tests Portfolios: delegate work tests to record proficient information and aptitudes Kauchak and Eggen, Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, third Ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights saved.

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Accountability and High-Stakes Testing No Child Left Behind: government enactment that endeavors to make schools and school areas responsible for the learning advancement of each understudy Accountability levels States – for accomplishment of understudies in the state Districts – for accomplishment of locale's understudies Schools – for accomplishment of school's understudies Teachers – for their understudies' learning progress High-stakes tests: used to consider all levels responsible; can have unfavorable results if not passed Kauchak and Eggen, Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, third Ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights held.

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