Mass Communication: A Critical Approach

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Mass Correspondence: A Basic Methodology. Section 1. 2006 National Midterm Decision.

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Mass Communication: A Critical Approach Chapter 1

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2006 National Midterm Election "In a majority rules system, we frequently rely on upon political promotions and the news media to give data that helps us pick our chose leaders....Did the news media's scope help us better comprehend a decision loaded with 'mud-throwing' advertisements?" — Richard Campbell

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The Media Storytellers At its most exceedingly terrible, the media's hunger for recounting and offering stories drives them to abuse or distort disaster. Rush starting with one occasion then onto the next Lose their basic separation "Operation Iraqi Freedom" and "implanted" writers At their best, our media reflect and maintain the qualities and conventions of an imperative majority rule government. Connect with and engage Watch over society's organizations

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"It's the employment of columnists to make convoluted things fascinating." — David Halberstam

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Cultural Contexts Cultural foundations/social businesses: Media Schools Art Beliefs News-conveyance advances the new covers the old the old battles to hold essentialness

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Eras of Communication Oral correspondence Written correspondence Printed correspondence Electronic correspondence Digital correspondence When did mass correspondence begin?

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Digital Communication and Media Convergence Digital believers data (letters, pictures, sounds) into paired code… 1s… the dialect of PCs. Once computerized, data can be shared among various media a great deal more effortlessly. Joining alludes to the presence of more established media frames on the freshest media channels. Meeting likewise alludes to daily paper, communicate, and Internet outlets existing under one corporate rooftop.

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Models of Mass Communication Linear Model: Sender—message—broad communications channel—(guards)— beneficiaries How does criticism fit into the model? Social Approach: Individual social part Selective introduction Storytelling

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Cultural Landscapes Culture as a Skyscraper: High culture Low culture Different media for each But many individuals expend both Culture as a Map: Culture is a progressing, changing procedure Modern versus postmodern qualities

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Culture as Skyscraper "Culture...was turning out to be progressively composed amid the twentieth century. Furthermore, the model for that association was the various leveled, bureaucratic partnership." — Jackson Lears

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Skyscraper Model: Opera versus People Music Some who like Beethoven additionally like American Idol . Did The Munsters rip off Mary Shelley's Frankenstein ? Does pop culture ruin open life? Televisions being used for over seven hours a day More refined culture battles to discover a crowd of people Popular media may restrain social advance by changing us into social hoodwinks. We have been tempted by the guarantee of items. The "Huge Mac" hypothesis: we have lost our separating taste for better charge

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Map Model: Shifting Values Among the four estimations of the current time frame: Individuality Confidence in reason and science Working effectively Rejecting custom Postmodern culture (show) changes present day values

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Postmodern Values Four elements of the postmodern: Opposing chain of command Diversifying and reusing society Raising questions about logical thinking But warmly grasping innovation

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Media Literacy Critical approach, not negative Pay close consideration Analysis of certainties, not minor checking of actualities Interpretation and significance Ethical/moral assessment of importance Take activity to shape the social condition

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The Rules of Engagement Reassess and remake the measures by which we judge our way of life Recognize the connections between social expression and day by day life Monitor how well the media serve just practices

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