Making Work Pay: Eliminating Financial Disincentives to Employment for People with Disabilities

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Bruce Borden, a Wisconsin subject united with a few companions who had high cost, high care handicaps and broad therapeutic and home consideration needs.In 1996, they outlined an expense offer methodology crosswise over key open advantages so they could bear to go to work.

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Making Work Pay: Eliminating Financial Disincentives to Employment for People with Disabilities State of Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

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Bruce Borden, a Wisconsin national united with a few companions who had high cost, high care incapacities and broad restorative and home care needs. In 1996, they planned a cost-share approach crosswise over key open advantages so they could bear to go to work. "Making Work Pay" depends on Bruce's own involvement with boundaries and disincentives to work. Bruce has supported to approach producers in Wisconsin and DC for over 10 years for a cost-share "Making Work Pay" choice. With Making Work Pay, I can be a citizen and pay what's coming to me towards the cost of my care."

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3 2 1 4 Making Work Pay: Economic Advancement Making Work Pay: a wellbeing net for people with inabilities who are looking to progress financially From income, MWP enrollee becomes tied up with advantages continuation on a cost-share premise No Fear! Proceeded with cooperation in key open advantage programs Full winning and financial potential No salary or resource tops

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National VR business reality FFY '03 results information Receives SSI & SSDI N=3,556 Receives SSDI N=15,456 Receives SSI N=15,733 Receives no SSA benefits N=149,198 CSAVR Response to the Government Accountability Office (GAO) Audit of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program

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National VR business reality FFY '03 results information Receives SSI & SSDI N=3,556 Receives SSI N=15,733 Receives no SSA benefits N=149,198 Receives SSDI N=15,456 CSAVR Response to the Government Accountability Office (GAO) Audit of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program

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MA-Buy in projects (19 states) Distribution of Earnings Buy-In Enrollees, 2002 4 th quarter The Effectiveness of Medicaid Buy-in Programs in Promoting the Employment of People with Disabilities Briefing Paper Prepared for the: Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Advisory Panel

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Making Work Pay : Wisconsin's "People to come" Answer to Work Incentive Reform for People with Disabilities First Generation The Red Book of SSA Work Incentives Plans for Achieving Self Support (PASS) 1619 A & 1619 B projects to proceed with Medicaid Eligibility Earned Income rejection and SSI $2 for $1 Impairment Related Work Expense findings Second Generation The "Ticket To Work" create another up front investment for Medicaid advantage; grow Medicare qualification create and extend national work bolster organize suspend medicinal surveys and build up simple come back to SSDI benefits SSDI early mediation and SSDI $2 for $1benefit counterbalance demos Next Generation – National Employment Investment Policy "Making Work Pay" make an 'up front investment' advantage choice crosswise over open frameworks

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$ $ SSI SSDI Waiver Medical advantages SSDI HUD NO Benefit Impact Coordination or Integrated Reporting Varied effects for T-18 and T-19 win big or bust effect (bluff) delicate diminishment in real money (slant) soak lessening in real money (slant) Current Silo Structure versus One-Stop Portal Structure for Public Benefit Support when working $ MWP SSI/SSDI, HUD, Medicaid/Medicare + cost share rate Benefit Coordination and Integrated Reporting cost share = no advantage lessening

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Mike Median $39,070 in normal wages (source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 2005 wage information – Milwaukee PMSA) Will it Pay to Work? Tom Beneficiary 42 years of age Lives in Milwaukee, WI Single, No Children 6 years on SSDI - current advantage of $939/mo. 1 room Section 8 voucher of $251/mo. Has Medicare Insurance Potential MA purchase in member CWIC

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2006 Comparative Work Effort Gains ( estimations from WI CHEQ mini-computer) No Work Effort Above SGA of $860 Average SSDI benefit Wage = $9.15/hour of $939 per month @ 34 hrs./week No earned Income $ 0 SSDI 939 HUD sponsorship 251 Tax credits 97 Net Monthly Income $1,287 Annual Income $15,444 Net wage equivalency of $7.43/hour @ 40 hours/week Earned income $1,353 SSDI 0 HUD endowment 123 Tax installments (194) Net Monthly Income $1,282 Annual Income $15,394 Net wage equivalency of $7.40/hour @ 40 hours/week 0% financial increase over no work exertion Net

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2006 Comparative Work Effort Gains (figurings from WI CHEQ mini-computer ) No Work Effort Earn < SGA of $860 Average SSDI benefit Wage = $9.15/hour of $939/month @ 20 hrs./week Earned Income $ 0 SSDI 939 HUD appropriation 251 Tax credits 97 Net Monthly Income $1,287 Annual Income $15,444 Net wage equivalency of $7.43/hour @ 40 hours/week Earned income $796 SSDI 939 HUD sponsorship 13 Tax installments (19) Net Monthly Income $1,729 Annual Income $20,748 Net wage equivalency of $9.98/hour @ 40 hours/week 34% monetary increase over no work exertion

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2006 Comparative Work Effort Gains ( counts from WI CHEQ number cruncher) No Work Effort SGA in addition to $1/$2 waiver Average SSDI advantage Wage = $9.15/hour of $939 every month @ 34 hrs./week No earned Income $ 0 SSDI 939 HUD sponsorship 251 Tax credits 97 Net Monthly Income $1,287 Annual Income $15,444 Net wage equivalency $7.43/hour @ 40 hours/week Earned income $1,353 SSDI 692 HUD appropriation 0 Tax installments (295) Net Monthly Income $1,750 Annual Income $21,000 Net wage equivalency of $10.10/hour @ 40 hours/week 36% financial increase over no work exertion

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2006 Comparative Work Effort Gains (computations from WI CHEQ mini-computer) No Work Effort Making Work Pay Cost Share Average SSDI advantage Wage = $9.15/hour of $939 every month @ 34 hrs./week Earned Income $ 0 SSDI 939 HUD sponsorship 251 Tax credits 97 Net Monthly Income $1,287 Annual Income $15,444 Net wage equivalency $7.43/hour @ 40 hours/week Earned income $1,353 SSDI 939 HUD sponsorship 251 Tax installments (323) 15% Cost Share (203) Net Monthly Income $2,017 Annual Income $24,204 Net wage equivalency $11.64/hour @ 40 hours/week 57% financial increase over no work exertion

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2006 Comparative Work Effort Gains ( figurings from WI CHEQ mini-computer) No Work Effort Making Work Pay Cost Share Average SSDI advantage Wage = $18.30/hour of $939 every month @ 34 hrs./week Earned Income $ 0 SSDI 939 HUD appropriation 251 Tax credits 97 Net Monthly Income $1,287 Annual Income $15,444 Net wage equivalency $7.43/hour @ 40 hours/week Earned income $2705 SSDI 939 HUD appropriation 251 Tax installments (871) 15% Cost Share (406) Net Monthly Income $2,618 Annual Income $31,416 Net wage equivalency $15.10/hour @ 40 hours/week 103% monetary increase over no work exertion

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Making Work Pay Cost Share National Employment Investment Policy A New Kind of Public Support financial motivating force to work and acquire as much as you are worth in the occupation showcase proceeded with advantage security net kills dread of a work interruption Ability to contribute a decent amount towards the cost of your care and open backings

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Wisconsin's MWP exhibition SSA, MA and HUD exhibition specialist $8.1 million Wisconsin show Experimental research outline 400 enrollees and 400 control members 7 years of statewide operation and research with 5 entire years of information gathering

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MWP Demonstration accomplices Governor Jim Doyle and "Develop Wisconsin" Plan Department of Workforce Development – lead office Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Division of Unemployment Insurance Department of Health and Family Services University Research Partners Cornell University - Institute for Policy Research Univ. of Madison - Institute for Poverty Research

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What would we like to learn? Regardless of whether a cost share way to deal with work motivation change will create enough work increment among people with huge handicaps to warrant changing open approach.

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Will there be woodwork impacts? Making Work Pay keeps up the present qualification principles for SSI/DI and does not affect medicinal survey plans. the gauges are strict/stringent, in this manner restricting advantages to just those with the most serious handicaps. … less that 55% of the individuals who apply for incapacity benefits under the Social Security Act were permitted in FFY 2002 . (Jensen & Silverstein, 2005).

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Will there be woodwork impacts? … there is probably all, or possibly about all, Social Security handicap recipients have genuine weaknesses. (Government managed savings Advisory Board, 2003). ...When all is said in done, arrangements expected to elevate come back to work for debilitated specialists are to some degree restricted in accomplishing generous outcomes by the seriousness of the incapacitating condition required to meet all requirements for advantages under the present program. Numerous recipients have next to zero prospect for recuperation from their incapacitating condition... ( Stephen C.

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