Biointerfacial Characterization 125:583 Nanoparticles L. Anthony and P. Moghe

Slide1 l.jpg
1 / 40
0
0
845 days ago, 278 views
PowerPoint PPT Presentation
Presentation/setting: Particles at biointerfacesProperties of particles in scatterings/emulsions Particle Size and Particle Size Distribution Surface Charge: Zeta Potential, Isoelectric Point, Electrophoretic Mobility. Diagram for Nanoparticle Characterization: Part I. Appointed papers. Nanoscale anionic macromolecules for particular maintenance of low-thickness lipoproteinsChnari E, Lari HB, Tian L,

Presentation Transcript

Slide 1

Biointerfacial Characterization (125:583) Nanoparticles L. Anthony and P. Moghe Lectures: Nov. sixteenth: Part I: Nanoparticle Characterization** Dec. fourth: Part II: Biological Characterization (Nanoparticles at Interfaces) Lab Demo: November twentieth: Particle Size by DLS; Zeta Potential [8:40 - 9:20 AM; Wright-Rieman Labs, Room 396] ** Slides in this set are for November sixteenth

Slide 2

Outline for Nanoparticle Characterization: Part I Introduction/setting: Particles at biointerfaces Properties of particles in scatterings/emulsions Particle Size and Particle Size Distribution Surface Charge: Zeta Potential, Isoelectric Point, Electrophoretic Mobility Assigned papers Nanoscale anionic macromolecules for specific maintenance of low-thickness lipoproteins Chnari E, Lari HB, Tian L, Uhrich KE, Moghe PV BIOMATERIALS 26 (17): 3749-3758 JUN 2005 Optimization of the planning procedure for human serum egg whites (HSA) nanoparticles K. Langer, S. Balthasar V. Vogel, N. Dinauer H. von Briesen D. Schubert INT. J. PHARMACEUTICS 257 (2003) 169-18

Slide 3

Other papers/data posted on class site: Albumin-determined nanocarriers: Substrates for improved cell cement ligand show and cell motility Sharma RI, Pereira M, Schwarzbauer JE, Moghe PV BIOMATERIALS 27 (19): 3589-3598 JUL 2006 Quantum speck bioconjugates for imaging, marking, and detecting Medintz, IL, Uyeda, HT, Goldman, ER, Mattoussi, H NATURE MATERIALS, 4, 435-446 (2005) A Nanoparticle-Based Model Delivery System To Guide the Rational Design of Gene Delivery to the Liver. 1. Amalgamation and Characterization Stephen R. Popielarski, Suzie H. Pun,† and Mark E. Davis* BIOCONJUGATE CHEM. 1063 2005, 16, 1063-1070 Vesicle Size Distributions Measured by Flow Field-Flow Fractionation Coupled with Multiangle Light Scattering Brian A. Korgel, John van Zanten, Harold Monbouquette BIOPHYSICAL JOURNAL 74 June 1998 3264–3272 Short Monographs by Vendors: Basic Principles of Particle Size Analysis Zeta Potential, a Complete Course in Five Minutes The Importance of Sample Viscosity in Dynamic Light Scattering Measurements A Guide to Choosing a Particle Sizer

Slide 4

Outline for Part I: Nanoparticle Characterization Introduction/setting: Particles at biointerfaces Properties of particles in scatterings/emulsions Particle Size and Particle Size Distribution Surface Charge: Zeta Potential, Isoelectric Point, Electrophoretic Mobility

Slide 5

Introduction/Context: Particles at biointerfaces Some purposes behind utilizing designed nanoparticles in biointerfacial research: to study/impact a phone procedure Example: Albumin-inferred nanocarriers: Substrates for upgraded cell glue ligand show and cell motility Sharma RI, Pereira M, Schwarzbauer JE, Moghe PV BIOMATERIALS 27 (19): 3589-3598 JUL 2006 to transport drugs/biomaterials or biomolecules ***Example: Nanoscale anionic macromolecules for particular maintenance of low-thickness lipoproteins Chnari E, Lari HB, Tian L, Uhrich KE, Moghe PV BIOMATERIALS 26 (17): 3749-3758 JUN 2005 to envision marvels, for example, transport, sequestration, and so on Example: Quantum dab bioconjugates for imaging, naming, and detecting Medintz, IL, Uyeda, HT, Goldman, ER, Mattoussi, H NATURE MATERIALS, 4, 435-446 (2005) *** Paper for discourse; cases given later in talk

Slide 6

Further alter/build particles/scattering >Conjugated atoms >Buffers/salts >etc Make (or buy) the nanoparticles or potentially the scattering Introduce particles into tissue/cell/subcellular framework and Study the particles as well as the impacts of the particles tissue, cells or sub-cell framework under review Introduction/Context: Particles at biointerfaces Generic perspective of investigations with particles at biointerfaces:

Slide 7

Further change/design particles/scattering >Conjugated atoms >Buffers/salts >etc tissue, cells or sub-cell framework under review Introduction/Context: Properties of particles in scatterings/emulsions Note: Properties of the molecule at the biointerface rely on upon: Intrinsic properties of particles AND Mediating properties of the fluid phase(s ) Introduce particles into tissue/cell/subcellular framework (in vitro normally) Study impact of particles Make (or buy) the nanoparticles as well as scattering Note: cell milieu is an exceptionally complex dispersant!

Slide 8

tissue, cells or sub-cell framework under review Introduction/Context: Properties of particles in scatterings/emulsions Properties of Particles in scattering or cell milieu Average size (width) Size dissemination Shape Bulk compound structure Surface piece covalently connected atoms adsorbed species surface charge (zeta potential) Compliance/modulus, and so forth Pore measure/harshness Crystalline/nebulous Refractive file Density Cover up Properties of Particles Average size (breadth) Size conveyance Shape Bulk substance arrangement Crystalline/undefined Pore estimate/unpleasantness Surface organization covalently connected particles adsorbed species Compliance/modulus, and so on Refractive list Density Properties of Dispersant (s) Aqueous or natural? (on the other hand blend?) Bulk sythesis Additives (what?, the amount?) Ionic or non-charged Small atoms Bio and large scale atoms pH, conductivity Viscosity Refractive file Density

Slide 9

tissue, cells or sub-cell framework under review Introduction/Context: Properties of particles in scatterings/emulsions Properties of Particles in scattering or cell milieu Average size (breadth) Size dissemination Shape Bulk concoction organization Surface piece covalently connected particles adsorbed species surface charge (zeta potential) Compliance/modulus, and so forth Pore estimate/unpleasantness Crystalline/formless Refractive list Density Cover up Properties of Particles Average size (measurement) Size appropriation Shape Bulk substance arrangement Crystalline/undefined Pore measure/harshness Surface structure covalently connected particles adsorbed species Compliance/modulus, and so on Refractive list Density Properties of Dispersant (s) Aqueous or natural? (alternately blend?) Bulk creation Additives (what?, the amount?) Ionic or non-charged Small atoms Bio and full scale atoms pH, conductivity Viscosity Refractive file Density

Slide 10

Outline for Part I: Nanoparticle Characterization Introduction/setting: Particles at biointerfaces Properties of particles in scatterings/emulsions Particle Size and Particle Size Distribution Surface Charge: Zeta Potential, Isoelectric Point, Electrophoretic Mobility

Slide 11

group fractionation tallying/"sorting" Particle Size and Distribution: "Families" of Measurement Principles All particles broke down all the while Based on first standards (optics, acoustics, and so forth) Size got from bend fitting/network reversal Distribution information from further calculations on information Dynamic Light Scattering Static Light Scattering (& Laser Diffraction) Acoustic Attenuation Particles isolated/sorted in space/time Based on differential (zonal) relocation Size acquired by correlation with alignment gauges Distribution information from finder yield (graphical follow) Size Exclusion Chromatogr. Slim Hydrodynamic Flow Field Flow Fractionation Electrophoresis [Sedimentation Velocity] Particles isolated (weakened) however not sorted Based on size-subordinate change in electronic (V, I, R, C, L) or optical flag Size acquired from earlier alignment (instrumental) Distribution information from electronic "binning" of identifier signs Coulter & Elzone (r) Accusizer (r) Microscopy with picture investigation is practically equivalent to Also: hyphenated techniques: e.g. fractionation strategy with group technique identification (e.g. FFF-DLS).

Slide 12

Ensemble Methods Dynamic Light Scattering Brownian Motion of Particles; fleeting variances in force of scattered light Static Light Scattering (& Laser Diffraction) Angular reliance of power of scattered light (Rayleigh/Mie ) (new, not generally utilized; not shrouded in this address) Acoustic Attenuation "Instrument as discovery" approach: Put test in cuvette (weakening if essential per mfgr's. directions) Enter known constants or acknowledge instrument defaults (e.g. refractive list, consistency, and so on) Choose flexible parameters or acknowledge instrument defaults Press GO; return when done; select print Now, how about we investigate…

Slide 13

Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) otherwise known as Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS) otherwise known as Quasielastic Light Scattering (QELS) Step 1: Make the optical estimation: Temporal vacillations in force of scattered light (wavelength and edge are set by instrument; RI is info or accepted) "spot design" Figures from: http://www.science.uva.nl/~sprik/masterlaser/dlsexp/dls.html

Slide 14

Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) otherwise known as Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS) otherwise known as Quasielastic Light Scattering (QELS) Step 1: Make the optical estimation: Temporal variances in power of scattered light (wavelength and edge are set by instrument; RI is info or expected) **Step 2: Establish the connection work and understand for D r **Step 3: Use the Stokes-Einstein relationship to settle for R h (D h = 2R h ) **Step 4: Further process autocorrelation information to get circulation data **Done by the instrument, in spite of the fact that client can alter sources of info and preparing choices

Slide 15

Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) otherwise known as Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS) otherwise known as Quasielastic Light Scattering (QELS) Step 1: Make the optical estimation: Temporal changes in power of scattered light (wavelength and point are set by instrument; RI is information or accepted) Step 2: Establish the connection work and decide D r Step 3: Use the Stokes-Einstein relationship to comprehend for Rh (Dh= 2Rh) Step 4: Further process autoco

SPONSORS