Adding to a Part 46 Training Plan

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Welcome. Feb. 20-24, 2006

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Slide 1

Building up a Part 46 Training Plan

Slide 2

Welcome Feb. 20-24, 2006 "Concentrate on Safety Week" for Metal and Nonmetal Mines Nationwide

Slide 3

Session Agenda I. Welcome and Introductory Remarks Part 46 Regulatory Review Writing a Training Plan Training Resources Session Wrap-up

Slide 4

Regulatory Overview

Slide 5

Under Part 46 Who Has to be Trained? Mineworkers and different people at : Shell digging Sand Gravel Surface Stone Surface Clay Colloidal phosphate AND Surface Limestone mines

Slide 6

Who is Considered an "Excavator"? Any individual, including any administrator or director, who works at a mine and who is occupied with mining operations; Includes self employed entities and representatives of self employed entities who are occupied with mining operations; AND Any development specialist who is presented to risks of mining operations .

Slide 7

What is the Minimum Information Required for a Training Plan? Name of creation administrator or self employed entity, mine name(s), MSHA mine ID number(s) or self employed entity number(s). Name and position of individual assigned who is in charge of wellbeing & security preparing.

Slide 8

What is the Minimum Information Required for a Training Plan? 3 . General portrayal of showing techniques, course materials, branches of knowledge and estimated time for each branch of knowledge. Rundown of people and additionally associations who will give preparing and branch of knowledge each is equipped to teach. Assessment strategies used to decide adequacy of preparing.

Slide 9

Who Can Conduct Training? Equipped Person – implies a man assigned by the creation administrator or self employed entity who has the capacity, preparing, learning or experience to give preparing to excavators in his or her range of mastery. Must have the capacity to viably convey the preparation subject to diggers and to assess whether the preparation given to mineworkers is viable .

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Who Can Conduct Training? You may direct your preparation State or government offices Associations of creation administrators or self employed entities Miners' delegates Consultants Manufacturers' agents Private affiliations Educational foundations

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How Should the Training Be Conducted? Classroom guideline Instruction at the mine Interactive PC based direction Alternative preparing innovations Any mix of preparing techniques

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What are the Categories of Training Required by the Standard ? New digger preparing Newly procured experienced excavator preparing New errand preparing Annual refresher preparing Site particular danger mindfulness preparing Contractor preparing

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New Miner Training New Miner – individual who is starting work as a mineworker with a generation administrator or self employed entity and who is not an accomplished excavator. No under 24 hours of preparing is required for new mineworkers.

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New Miner Training: Before Beginning Work at the Mine (No Less Than 4 Hours) Introduction to workplace; Recognition and shirking of electrical and different risks; Review of the crisis medicinal, escape and crisis departure arranges, firewarning and firefighting; Health & security parts of doled out undertakings; Statutory privileges of excavators; Authority and obligation of bosses and mineworkers' agents Introduction to tenets and systems of detailing perils

Slide 15

New Miner Training: No Later Than 60 Calendar Days After Beginning Work at Mine Instruction being used, care and upkeep of self-safeguard and respiratory gadgets (if being used) Review of emergency treatment techniques

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New Miner Training: No Later Than 90 Calendar Days After Beginning Work at Mine Provide with adjust, assuming any, of the 24 hours of preparing on some other subjects that advance wellbeing & wellbeing for diggers.

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Newly Hired Experienced Miner Training Experienced Miner – individual utilized as a mineworker on or after October 2, 2000 who has finished 24 hours of new digger preparing under Sect. 46.5 of this part or under Sect. 48.25 of this title and who has no less than 12 total months of surface mining or comparable experience.

Slide 18

Newly Hired Experienced Miner: Before Beginning Work at the Mine Introduction to workplace; Recognition and evasion of electrical and different dangers; Review of the crisis therapeutic, escape and crisis departure arranges, firewarning and firefighting; Health & security parts of relegated undertakings; Statutory privileges of excavators; Authority and obligation of managers and diggers' agents Introduction to guidelines and methodology of detailing perils

Slide 19

Newly Hired Experienced Miner: No Later Than 60 Calendar Days After Beginning Work at Mine Instruction being used, care and upkeep of self-save and respiratory gadgets (if being used)

Slide 20

New Task Training To be given to any mineworker who is reassigned to another errand in which he/she has no past work encounter Train in the wellbeing & security angles and safe work strategies particular to that new assignment Provide before the mineworker plays out the new undertaking

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Annual Refresher Training No under 8 hours No later than 12 months after the excavator starts work at the mine

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Annual Refresher Training Changes at the mine that could antagonistically influence diggers' wellbeing or wellbeing; Other pertinent wellbeing and wellbeing points.

Slide 23

Applicable wellbeing and security prerequisites Hazard Communication Transportation controls and correspondence frameworks Escape and crisis clearing arranges Firewarning and firefighting Use of hand-apparatuses and welding hardware Material dealing with Ground conditions and control Traffic examples and control Working in zones of highwalls Water dangers Prevention of mischances Explosives Respirators Working around moving items (machine guarding) Fall counteractive action and insurance Other Relevant Topics

Slide 24

Other Relevant Topics: Equipment - Specific Training Haulage and administration trucks Front-end loaders and tractors Conveyor frameworks Cranes Crushers Excavators Dredges Maintenance and repair

Slide 25

Site-Specific Hazard Awareness Training (SSHAT) Must be given before any individual indicated is presented to mine perils SSHAT is data or guidelines on the risks a man could be presented to while at the mine and crisis systems. Not required for any individual who is joined whatsoever circumstances by an accomplished digger acquainted with the dangers.

Slide 26

Who Must Receive SSHAT? Office or staff faculty Scientific laborers Delivery specialists Customers, including business over-the-street drivers Construction specialists Maintenance or administration laborers Vendors or guests

Slide 27

Independent Contractor Training Production-administrator has duty regarding giving SSHAT and data in regards to the contractual worker's obligation to conform to MSHA preparing prerequisites: New digger preparing Newly enlisted experienced mineworker preparing New undertaking preparing Annual refresher preparing

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Developing a Part 46 Training Plan

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2005 Metal/Nonmetal Fatal Accident Review www.msha.gov/details/audit/2005/2005review.asp

Slide 31

MNM Fatals

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MNM Fatalities by Commodity * Trona, Lime, Platinum, Pumice, Phosphate, Iron Ore, Sandstone, Potash, Copper

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MNM Fatalities by Classification

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MNM Fatalities by Mine Size

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MNM Fatalities by Age

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MNM Fatalities by Mining Experience

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MNM Fatalities by Activity

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MNM Fatalities by Occupation

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Root Causes Note: Fatalities may have a few underlying drivers.

Slide 40

MNM Fatalities – 1995-2005

Slide 42

Fatalgrams and Fatal Investigation Reports Metal and Nonmetal Mines www.msha.gov/fatals/fab.htm

Slide 43

METAL/NONMETAL MINE FATALITY - On January 27, 2006, a 60-year old substantial gear administrator with 10 years mining knowledge was lethally harmed at a pulverized stone operation. He was working a dozer to set up a seat for boring. The dozer went over the edge of a 50-foot highwall and tumbled to the quarry floor, submerging the taxi in a few feet of mud and water.

Slide 44

METAL/NONMETAL MINE FATALITY - On January 27, 2006, a 60-year old substantial gear administrator with 10 years mining knowledge was lethally harmed at a squashed stone operation. He was working a dozer to set up a seat for boring. The dozer went over the edge of a 50-foot highwall and tumbled to the quarry floor, submerging the taxicab in a few feet of mud and water. Best Practices Stop, Look, Analyze, and Manage (SLAM) each errand to distinguish every single potential peril before performing work. Keep up and wear safety belts while working hardware. Continuously keep the edge amongst yourself and the edge of the highwall while working a dozer on the highwall seat. Work gear with the goal that control is kept up. Diminish the throttle position and know how to instantly stop the dozer when working close to the edge of the highwall. Give sufficient light when work is performed amid non-sunshine hours.

Slide 45

METAL/NONMETAL MINE FATALITY - On January 6, 2006, a 39-year old repairman with 12 years mining background was lethally harmed at a sand and rock operation while taking a shot at a front-end loader. The front and back areas of the loader had been isolated at the explanation joint and each segment was freely bolstered with jack stands. The casualty was situated between the left back tire and casing to evacuate a pressure driven hose. The casing of the loader tipped forward on the tires and swiveled to one side on the back hub swaying trunnion, sticking him.

Slide 46

METAL/NONMETAL MINE FATALITY - On January 6, 2006, a 39-year old workman with 12 years mining knowledge was lethally harmed at a sand and rock operation while chipping away at a front-end loader. The front and rea

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